CHARACTERIZATION OF A BLACK BEAR MICROSATELLITE MULTIPLEX OPTIMIZED FOR NONINVASIVELY COLLECTED SAMPLES IN CALIFORNIA.
Camilo J. Sanchez; University of California, Davis; 2718 Anza Ave, Davis, CA, 95616; (530) 400-3865; casanchez@ucdavis.edu; Julia Owen, Stevi Vanderzwan, Michael Buchalski, Ben Sacks
California black bear management lacks a noninvasive genetic abundance monitoring program for sustainable harvest and population control. To that end, we aimed to test and optimize a microsatellite multiplex genotyping assay for individual identification and sex determination of black bears from DNA extracted from scat. Primers for 14 autosomal loci and a sex marker were divided into two multiplex assays by identifying primer conflicts and maximizing the distance between allele size ranges of different loci labeled with the same fluorescent dye. We then used 100 field-collected bear scat samples genotyped in triplicate to assess error in fecal DNA analysis, specifically, allelic dropout and false allele rates, validated with 5 paired scat and buccal swab samples from captive zoo bears. We anticipate this study will result in a high-resolution genetic assay for individual identification and sex determination in California black bears that can be used for estimating abundance and population structure.
Poster Session