PRESENCE, DIVERSITY, AND ABUNDANCE OF NEOTROPICAL MIGRANT AND RESIDENT BIRDS AT THE DESERT STUDIES CENTER.
Francine A. De Castro; Sacramento City College; 2477 Sycamore Lane Apt F3, Davis, CA, 95616; (858) 774-2180; Fadelara@ucdavis.edu; Stanley Wright
The Desert Studies Center (DSC) just south of Baker, California is an oasis on the western side of the Mojave National Preserve. Home to the endangered Mojave Tui Chub, the DSC's two man-made ponds, including the tamarisk and mesquite that grow around them, provide important habitat for both resident and neotropical migratory birds. Since these efforts began in 2015, 22 different species of birds have been banded at the DSC using USGS BBL bands. Banding has occurred every year since 2015, for a period of 2-5 days during the end of May, from sunrise to 90 deg F and in the evenings from <90 deg F to 8PM. A total of 131.5 net hours over the last four years yielded a total of 100 captured and banded birds- a combination of 15 neotropical migrant species, and 7 Mojave residents species. Morphometrics and evaluations were recorded for each bird per USGS BBL standards, and the vast majority of birds were determined to be AHY. This poster will highlight the diversity and abundance of the resident and neotropical migrant birds at the DSC per the data collected over our study period.
Poster Session   Student Paper