OUTFOXED NO MORE: SIERRA NEVADA RED FOX CAPTURES REVEAL NEW INSIGHTS INTO HABITAT USE AND REPRODUCTION.
Jennifer E. Carlson; California Department of Fish and Widlife - Northern Region; 601 Locust St., Redding, CA, 96022; (530) 225-2754; jennifer.carlson@wildlife.ca.gov; Pete Figura, Deana Clifford, Cate Quinn, Benjamin Sacks
Many unanswered questions remain regarding the ecology, population size, and population trend of the rare and state-threatened Sierra Nevada red fox (SNRF) in California. After several seasons without success, California Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists captured and collared one male and two female SNRFs in winter and spring of 2018. One of the females was pregnant when captured in April. The three foxes were thoroughly examined and samples were collected for disease exposure and genetics. All three foxes were fitted with satellite tracking collars. Although all three collars failed prematurely, they provided valuable data while still functioning, including the approximate location of the pregnant female's den and significant movements. We will present data on seasonal home range estimates, movement patterns, reproduction, den site characteristics, animal health and disease exposure, and the genetic relationships of the captured foxes to other foxes identified across the study area (using noninvasive techniques over the past decade).
Ecology and Conservation of Mammals III