RESTORATION EFFORTS FOR THE SIERRA NEVADA YELLOW-LEGGED FROG (RANA SIERRAE) IN YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK.
Robert L. Grasso; Yosemite National Park; 5083 Foresta Road, El Portal , CA, 95318; (209) 379-1438; rob_grasso@nps.gov; Roland A. Knapp, Colleen D. Kamoroff, Jessie Bushell, Rachel Mazur
This presentation is part of the Yosemite NP Session talks. The federally endangered Sierra Nevada Yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae) has experienced sharp declines in the Sierra Nevada including Yosemite National Park over the last 30 years largely due to fish stocking and the highly invasive amphibian fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) that causes chytridiomycosis. Today, park populations of this once abundant frog are now increasing both naturally and due to restoration and recovery efforts underway in Yosemite. However, in several areas of the park that are now fishless this frog is not likely to recolonize on their own. In collaboration with the University of California, Santa Barbara, the San Francisco Zoo, and the Yosemite Conservancy the park is planning a new strategy to restore frogs in extirpated landscapes. The park will provide a historical overview of the project from fish stocking to current frog reintroduction efforts as well as showcase new insights to the winter ecology of this species.
Yosemite Restoration I