SUPPORTING INTEGRATION OF CLIMATE ADAPTATION STRATEGIES INTO CDFW WILDLIFE AND LAND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES.
Whitney L. Albright; California Department of Fish and Wildlife; 1416 9th Street, Sacramento, CA, 95816; whitney.albright@wildlife.ca.gov; Armand Gonzales, Dylan MacArthur-Waltz, Rachel Portillo
Climate change and associated biological impacts pose a major challenge to natural resource management. It has become increasingly important to integrate climate science and adaptation strategies into long-term conservation planning as well as on-the-ground land management and resource assessment efforts. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) manages 749 properties throughout the state totaling over 1,100,000 acres of fish and wildlife habitat. As a steward of the state's natural resources, CDFW has the opportunity and an obligation to manage CDFW lands for climate risks to ensure resilience of fish, wildlife, and the ecosystems on which they depend to environmental change. The CDFW Science Institute Climate Program evaluated the resilience and vulnerability of CDFW lands to inform long-term strategic planning and on-the-ground resource management decisions. The presentation will cover project background, assessment results, and opportunities to disseminate and apply the final products. The discussion will include an overview of climate vulnerability and resilience information for specific lands and associated wildlife, as well as offer ecoregional trends. This project was made possible through close collaboration with the Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment and the Haas Center for Public Service, a partnership that will be highlighted in the presentation.
Wildlife Professionals: Agency Coordination & Collaboration