IT'S GETTING HOT IN HERE: SALT MARSH HARVEST MOUSE SURVIVAL AND RECOVERY AFTER A WILDFIRE.
Melissa K Riley; California Department of Fish and Wildlife; 2825 Cordelia Road, Suite 100, Fairfield, CA, 94534; (209) 628-0247; Melissa.Riley@wildlife.ca.gov; Laureen Barthman-Thompson, Sarah Estrella, Candice Rose, Katherine Smith, Sadie Trombley, Sadie Trombley
The salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris sp., SMHM) is endemic to the tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay Estuary. SMHM have been listed as endangered since the 1970s, but in the Suisun Marsh current populations appear to be thriving. Recently, a wildfire burned more than 80% of the vegetation within the trapping grid at a long term SMHM monitoring site on the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, Joice Island Unit. Initial trapping one week after the fire showed that a surprising number of SMHM survived, however capture efficiency was lower than average for the time of year. The wildfire presents an opportunity as an interesting case study to explore how the SMHM and associated small mammal community respond after a fire event. Managers will benefit from this knowledge as wildfires and other catastrophic events become more common with global climate change. This case study will also provide insight into the response of SMHM to current management practices such as prescribed burns that are used to control invasive vegetation species.
Poster Session