ROOST USE AND MOVEMENT PATTERNS OF TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BATS (CORYNORHINUS TOWNSENDII) IN WHITE PINE COUNTY, NEVADA.
Laura M. Hancock; University of Massachusetts Amherst; 250 S County Road, Leyden, MA, 01301; (985) 237-0244; lhancock@umass.edu; Jason A. Williams, Bryan T. Hamilton, Megan L. Moran, Rick E. Sherwin
Frequently, spatially or temporally limited evidence is used to inform larger scale management and conservation decisions. This is especially true for harder to study taxa such as bats (e.g. small, nocturnal, able to fly). For example, historically, a single roost survey would be performed to inform roost management. However, more recent research shows that this limited evidence is likely not enough to determine whether a roost is important habitat, thus limiting the power to make viable management decisions. With the continuing spread of diseases such as white nose syndrome, habitat loss, and climate change, it is more critical than ever to gain a better understanding of the nuanced needs of bats in high risk areas to prevent further population losses and declines. In summer and fall of 2018, we used multiple tracking and monitoring techniques to gain a better understanding of where Townsend's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii) are using the landscape in White Pine County, Nevada. Specifically, we used Bat Call Detector Recorders (BCDRs), internal roost surveys, and radio telemetry to understand how Townsend's big-eared bats are using different roost types (e.g. caves, abandoned mines) and landscape features, which will ultimately help us to better inform conservation of this species.
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