HAWAIIAN HOARY BAT OCCUPANCY AND DISTRIBUTION ON O'AHU - A 1ST YEAR ANALYSIS.
Joel L. Thompson; WEST, Inc.; 2725 NW Walnut Blvd, Corvallis, OR, 97330; (307) 214-2799; jthompson@west-inc.com; Leigh Ann Starcevich, Troy Rintz, Erica Adamczyk, Donald Solick
Hawaiian hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) is the only land mammal endemic to Hawaii and is listed as Endangered at both the state and federal levels. Hawaiian hoary bat is regularly included as a covered species in Habitat Conservation Plans developed for actions that may result in incidental take of the species; however, determination of recovery benefits has been challenging due to the paucity of information concerning threats, limiting factors, life history, and ecology of the species. In collaboration with Hawaii's Endangered Species Research Committee, we initiated a multi-year study in 2017 to investigate the distribution and seasonal occupancy of Hawaiian hoary bat on the island of O'ahu. The objectives of the initial year of study were to 1) provide information on bat occupancy, distribution, and detection probabilities for the island of O'ahu, and 2) examine seasonal changes in distribution by estimating seasonal changes in occupancy. Acoustic bat detectors were deployed using an equiprobable generalized random tessellation stratified (GRTS) sample and as of fall 2018, 87 acoustic bat detectors were being monitored across O'ahu. In this presentation we describe the sampling design and methods for data collection and summarize results of the first year of field studies and occupancy analysis.
Ecology and Conservation of Mammals IV