INTEGRATING TELEMETRY DATA INTO SPATIAL CAPTURE-RECAPTURE TO BETTER INFER REST SITE SELECTION OF RINGTAILS IN NORTHWESTERN CALIFORNIA.
Kathleen P. Gundermann; Oregon State University; Mail Stop: INR, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR, 97207; (717) 222-9135; kpgund@gmail.com; Cale H. Myers, J. Mark Higley, David S. Green, Sean M. Matthews
The ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is a fully-protected species in California, but little is known about their basic ecology. Like other procyonids and forest carnivores, ringtails use diurnal rest sites to provide shelter, protection from predators, and sites to raise young. Understanding the characteristics of these rest sites will inform forest management and conservation efforts. We trapped and fixed VHF radio-collars to 19 adult ringtails on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation in 2008. Using triangulation and walk-in methods, ringtails were tracked to rest sites on 441 occasions. In the current research, we are integrating these VHF telemetry data with the spatial capture histories of ringtails to determine the habitat qualities selected for by ringtails at rest sites and more broadly at the habitat scale using spatial capture-recapture. In addition to understanding the qualities of the rest sites themselves, by using spatial capture-recapture we will also estimate the population size and habitat preferences through the integration of multiple data sources in a single analytical framework. These results from the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation will help improve our understanding of multi-scale resource selection by ringtails. With increased knowledge of rest site, habitat associations, and ringtail density, habitat can be better managed for ringtails.
Poster Session