EXPLORING HUMAN PERCEPTIONS AND CONFLICT SURROUNDING HUMAN-SEAL USE OF BEACHES IN OAHU, HAWAII.
Leilani S. Konrad; San Diego State University; 1799 Missouri St, San Diego, CA, 92109; (818) 458-0886; lkonrad@sdsu.edu; Arielle Levine
People's perceptions of wildlife are influenced by their broader values and differences in these values and perceptions can contribute to human-wildlife conflict. This research explores how values and broader environmental beliefs influence people's perceptions of wildlife, as well as the potential for human-wildlife conflict examining increasing seal use of beaches in heavily populated coastal areas. Specifically, we look at perceptions of California Harbor Seals in La Jolla, California, where conflict over seals' use of a beach has endured for 25 years and perceptions of Hawaiian Monk Seals in Oahu, Hawaii, where increasing seal populations are leading to more human interactions with growing potential for conflict. Using archival research, surveys, and interviews, we explore the sources of conflict in each location, including levels of conflict using the Conservation Conflict Transformation Framework (Madden and McQuinn, 2014), environmental beliefs using the New Environmental Paradigm (Dunlap, 2008), and value orientations based on Schwartz's (1994) norm-activation model. By combining multiple frameworks, we seek to identify core factors contributing to conflict in each of these distinctly different study sites and influencing people's perceptions of seals. This paper is a work-in-progress, but we will present preliminary findings from both archival analysis and the Hawaii case study.
Poster Session   Student Paper