GIS TOOLS TO PREDICT NESTING HABITAT SUITABILITY OF WOODPECKERS AND BAT OCCUPANCY FOR POST-FIRE PLANNING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA.
Brent R. Campos; Point Blue Conservation Science; 3820 Cypress Drive #11, Petaluma, CA, 94954; (530) 665-6413; bcampos@pointblue.org; Quresh S. Latif, Zachary L. Steel, Ryan D. Burnett, Victoria A. Saab
Burned forests provide habitat for many wildlife species. Land managers need information about habitat needs of these species to reduce negative impacts from post-fire management. Woodpeckers are focal species for informing management of recently burned forests. Bats are of increasing management concern, but little information exists on their habitat associations in post-fire landscapes in the Sierra Nevada. Habitat suitability models can be important tools for identifying areas that are likely to be used by wildlife in newly burned forest. Given limited time and funding for new wildlife surveys, managers need to be able to quickly apply these models soon after wildfire occurs. Here we present predictive models and user-friendly tools that map woodpecker nesting habitat and bat occupancy across burned mixed-conifer and true fir forests of the Sierra Nevada. We developed tools for four species of woodpecker using nest location data from three wildfires in the northern Sierra Nevada 1-5 years post-fire. We also developed tools for seven species of bat using data collected from three wildfires in the Sierra Nevada 1-13 years after fire. The tools are operable with limited technical expertise and provide data-driven information to inform management of these species in post-fire landscapes of the Sierra Nevada.
Ecology and Conservation of Birds II