ELUCIDATING PATTERNS OF BAT SPECIES OCCUPANCY ACROSS A DISTURBED LANDSCAPE IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY.
Trinity N. Smith; Humboldt State University; 1 Harpst St, Arcata, CA, 95521; (775) 340-4754; trinity.smith@humboldt.edu;
California's Central Valley, one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world, is home to 17 species of resident and migratory bats. The Central Valley ecoregion has been identified as a crisis ecoregion, and a high number of species are at risk due to habitat conversion and drought. In response to high intensity drought from 2011-2016, California Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Terrestrial Species Stressor Monitoring (TSM) project, which in part aimed to collect baseline occupancy data and habitat associations for bats. We conducted bat surveys using SM3BAT acoustic detectors at 274 sites spanning the Central Valley in both the driest year on record (2016) and the wettest year on record (2017). The resulting bat species detections were processed using Kaleidoscope software and were then manually vetted. These detection histories will be used to determine species-specific occupancy patterns for bats in the Central Valley, which can be used by managers to assess critical habitat areas.
Ecology and Conservation of Bats I   Student Paper