CALIFORNIA TIGER SALAMANDERS, EXCLUSION FENCING AND HIGH-SPEED RAIL CONSTRUCTION - A CASE STUDY.
Marcus D. Jones; Rincon Consultants; 7080 N Whitney Ave Suite 101, Fresno , CA, 93720; (559) 375-2717; Marcusjones@rinconconsultants.com; Krista Tomlinson
California High-Speed Rail has been under construction in the central valley for a few years with potentially adverse effects to wildlife. As construction expands, the interaction between construction and wildlife has become a common occurrence. The potential for adverse effects to sensitive biological resources is managed through the implementation of mitigation and avoidance measures. The use of wildlife exclusion fencing (WEF) as an avoidance measure in California tiger salamander (CTS) habitats is a unique tool designed to separate construction from occupied habitats. The project's use of WEF, in conjunction with cover-boards, has had variable success and continues to raise questions about the effectiveness of exclusion fencing and its role in conservation of CTS. Early results observed on this project, has indicated that fencing placement and material selection plays a significant role in the efficacy of WEF. The use of cover-boards has proven to be an efficient tool to shelter CTS along WEF; however, placement and season of use play significant roles in ensuring cover-board success. Wildlife encounters at construction sites will continue to increase. Evaluating the effectiveness of protective measures during construction will provide critical information to refine conservation efforts, and ensure wildlife will always have a place in California.
Wildlife Professionals: Consultant Case Studies