BALD EAGLE (HALIAEETUS LEUCOCEPHALUS) NESTING TRENDS AND DISTURBANCE SOURCES IN THE EAST BAY REGIONAL PARK DISTRICT.
David L. Riensche; East Bay Regional Park District; 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, CA, 94605; (510) 544-2319; driensche@ebparks.org; Shane T. Cano , Gaetano J. Palazzo
The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is an Endangered Species Act success story. Illegal shooting, habitat loss, and the pesticide DDT once threatened our national icon with extinction. Fortunately, the bald eagle population has recovered due to numerous conservation efforts. Specifically in the East Bay Regional Parks, established bald eagle nests have been protected at Lake Chabot and Lake Del Valle, two reservoirs open to public recreation. Since 2012, both nesting sites have been monitored by staff and trained volunteers. Analysis of the data collected between 2012 and 2017 provides an overview of their nesting trends and disturbance sources in urban-wildland interface. Their long-term breeding success, occurring within the East Bay Regional Park District, has averaged 1.27 fledglings per nesting pair. Disturbance sources such as red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), common raven (Corvus corax), and american crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) make up 42% of disturbances at Lake Chabot and 36% at Lake Del Valle. This information will aid in the future management and protection of nesting bald eagles.
Poster Session